The Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO)

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The Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory was launched April 7, 1991 and observed the high-energy Universe until June 4, 2000 when it safely de-orbited and burned up in the Earth's atmosphere. The mission of CGRO was to study gamma-ray emissions in not only our galaxy, but other galaxies beyond ours. In addition, it was to investigate how neutron stars and black holes change over time. The satellite carried four science instruments which allowed it to study the gamma-ray emissions from the universe in unprecedented detail. From creating an all-sky map which allowed scientists to better understand the interaction between cosmic rays and interstellar dust, to studying the mysterious phenomenon of gamma-ray bursts, CGRO opened wide a new window on the workings of the cosmos.

The Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory
The Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

Shuttle

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